FIT FOR DUTY – Thirty-seven recruits graduating from the Alaska Department of Public Safety Training Academy's Law Enforcement Training Session 1802 take the oath of office this afternoon at the Sheet'ka Kwaan Naa Kahidi. The audience was told that during the rigorous 16-week session recruits lost a combined 200 pounds of body fat. The graduates will be taking law enforcement positions around the state from the North Slope Borough Police Department to statewide Alaska Wildlife Troopers to the Ketchikan Police Department. Speaker at the ceremony was DPS Deputy Commissioner William Comer, who graduated from the academy in 1985. (Sentinel Photo by James Poulson)

March 6, 2014 Community Happenings

Stage Combat
    Class March 22-23
    The Greater Sitka Arts Council will offer a stage combat class for those in fifth grade and older who want to learn the fundamentals of stage fighting.
    Ira Snelling will teach give-and-take, blocks and dodges, falls and throws, combat math, partner work and how to perform a small duel.
    Applications may be found at the arts council website at thinkartthinksitka. The deadline to sign up is March 21. Classes are 1-4 p.m. March 22 and 23 at the Yaw Art building on the SJ Campus. The cost is $30 for advance registration and $40 at the door. The class is limited to 20 participants. For more information call Snelling at 738-9144 or 747-6461.

    Deadline Extended
    For USFS TAC
    The U.S. Forest Service has extended the application deadline for membership on the Tongass Advisory Committee for a second time, to Friday, March 14.
    The 15-member volunteer panel will meet roughly once a month to provide advice and recommendations to the Forest Service on developing a sustainable forest management strategy for the Tongass National Forest, with an emphasis on supporting a transition to young-growth management.
    Members will be selected to provide balanced and broad representation within the following interests: federally recognized tribes, Alaska Native organizations and/or Alaska Native corporation representatives; national or regional environmental and/or conservation organizations; timber industry representatives; federal, state, and local government representatives; and commercial users, those holding land use permits, or the public at large.
    Nominations may be obtained from the Web at www.fs.usda.gov/goto/R10/Tongass/TAC. For more information, contact Nicole McMurren, Tongass National Forest, at 907-772-5875 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

    ‘Raven’s Gift’
    Author Here
    The author of ‘Raven’s Gift,’ Don Reardon, will give an author presentation and book signing 6 p.m. March 12 at Kettleson Memorial Library.
    According to the Washington Post, Reardon’s debut novel ‘‘The Raven’s Gift’’ is a blend of “hunter-hunted suspense of Geoffrey Household’s ‘Rogue Male,’ the post-apocalyptic bleakness of Cormac McCarthy’s ‘The Road’ and the haunting mysteriousness of ‘The X-Files.’”

     Transportation
    Panel to Meet
    Sitka Tribe of Alaska’s transportation panel will meet noon March 10 at the STA Administration Building, 456 Katlian Street, in the conference room.
    Topics include: an update on the construction phase of the road improvement for “the RIDE” bus facility/turnaround/pullout on Indian River Road across from Peter Simpson Road, and the Bus Maintenance Facility project, Public Transit and Tribal Transit funding, and the Alaska Marine Highway System’s service to Sitka.
    Tribal citizens and interested public members are being encouraged to attend. For more information contact Gerry Hope, transportation director, 747-5910.

    Youth Advocates
    Board to Meet
    Youth Advocates of Sitka’s board of directors will meet 5:15-7 p.m. March 10 at YAS’s 805 Lincoln Street office.
    Meetings are open to the public. The group is accepting applications for board members. Interested persons should contact Annette at 747-3687 for more information.

    Rotary Accepts
    Grant Requests
    The Sitka Rotary Club is accepting applications for mini-grants from local nonprofit organizations.
    Go to www.sitkarotary.org, and click on the Community Giving Request Form tab in the lower right-hand column.
    The applications are due March 28.
    The Sitka Rotary Club is part of Rotary International, an organization dedicated to achieving peace through worldwide and local volunteer projects. The club in Sitka raises funds for its projects through its annual Rose Sale and Fourth of July Duck Race. “Fines” at club meetings are dedicated to Rotary’s efforts to eradicate polio worldwide.
    Those with questions about the grants may call 738-0602.

    Seniors’ Parents
    Asked to Help
    Parents of SHS seniors are being called to help with the graduation night party.
    The next organizational meeting will be the graduation party will be 7-9 p.m. March 12 in the Keet Gooshi Heen Elementary School library.
    Those who have not sent the organizers an email, may contact them at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .
Kaagwaantaan Meet
    Sitka Kaagwaantaan will meet 3 p.m. Sunday at Blatchley Middle School in Room 114 to practice songs and dance for Celebration 2014.

    ‘Raven’s Gift’
    Author at Library
    Don Reardon, author of “Raven’s Gift,” a thriller set on the windswept Alaskan tundra, will be giving a presentation and book signing 6 p.m. March 12 at Kettleson Memorial Library.
    ‘‘Raven’s Gift’’ is a debut novel and has been described by fellow author, Jodi Picoult as having “a winning plot, characters we’ve never met before and intriguing details of a world most of us will never venture to.”

    Pain Physiology
    Topic of Talk
    Pain physiology education classes will be offered free to the public noon-1 p.m. March 7, 14 and 21 at Oceanside Therapy Center, 805 Halibut Point Road, number 6.
    Call physical therapist Bridget Hitchcock at 747-1771 for more information.

    Change Smoke
    Alarm Batteries
    On March 9
    Alaska State Fire Marshal Kelly Nicolello reminds Alaskans to test and check the batteries in their smoke and carbon monoxide alarms when they change their clocks for Daylight-Saving Time Sunday, March 9.
    ‘‘Operating smoke and CO alarms can give Alaskans the precious time needed to exit the home in case of a devastating fire or carbon monoxide emergency,’’ Nicolello said in a press release.
    Many homes have smoke and CO alarms with batteries that should be replaced annually. Daylight-savings time can serve as a reminder to check the alarms and change the batteries.
    With the development of long-life lithium battery powered alarms, the batteries have a lifespan of up to 10 years, so homeowners may not need to replace this type of battery as often. The National Fire Protection Association suggests that 90 percent of American homes are equipped with smoke alarms but more than 50 percent of them are not in working condition.
    From 2009 to 2013, nine Alaskan children under the age of 13 lost their lives in eight fire incidents, Nicolello said. The lack of a working smoke alarm, adult negligence, or adult substance abuse definitely or probably contributed to all nine of these child fatalities (100 percent). Working smoke alarms could have made a difference in many of these devastating incidents.
    “Take a few minutes to check, test and clean your smoke and CO alarms to make sure they are functioning properly, and what better time to do this than when you change your clock for Daylight-Saving Time,” Nicollelo said.
    He said that it is important to remember that manufacturer’s guidelines for smoke and CO alarm installation, testing, cleaning, and replacing batteries should be followed. General recommendations can be found at The Alaska Division of Fire and Life Safety web site: www.burny.alaska.gov.
   
    Bard-a-Thon Set
    For March 9-15
    Sitkans are invited to help celebrate Shakespeare’s 450th birthday by taking part in a community reading of his complete works.
    Kettleson Memorial Library will offer, via videoconference, an opportunity for Sitkans to participate in the Bard-a-Thon. It is similar to a Reader’s Theatre event, citizens reading the plays outloud. Sitkans are invited not only to listen, but to participate in the reading as well.
    The Juneau Public Library in conjunction with the Friends of the Juneau Public Libraries, Fairbanks Shakespeare Theatre and Perseverance Theatre is hosting a Bard-a-Thon. It will  offer the noon, 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. readings March 9-15 on the OWL video conference system.
    Sitkans can participate by listening in or reading aloud. All ages are being encouraged to participate, particularly student groups, and to sign up as soon as possible. The best on-line version of the Complete Works is at http://shakespeare.mit.edu/.
    The reading schedule is:
    Sunday, March 9: noon ‘‘The Winter’s Tale’’; 3 p.m. ‘‘King John’’; 6 p.m. ‘‘Romeo and Juliet.’’
    Monday, March 10: noon ‘‘Love’s Labour’s Lost’’; 3 p.m. ‘‘As You Like It’’; 6 p.m. ‘‘Much Ado About Nothing.’’
    Tuesday, March 11: noon ‘‘The Comedy of Errors’’; 3 p.m. ‘‘Measure for Measure’’; 6 p.m. ‘‘Richard III.
    Wednesday, March 12: noon ‘‘The Two Gentlemen of Verona’’; 3 p.m. ‘‘Titus Andronicus’’; 6 p.m. ‘‘The Two Noble Kinsmen.’’
    Thursday, March 13: noon ‘‘Julius Caesar’’; 3 p.m. ‘‘Timon of Athens’’; 6 p.m. ‘‘The Taming of the Shrew.’’
    Friday, March 14: noon ‘‘Twelfth Night’’; 3 p.m. ‘‘The Merry Wives of Windsor’’; 6 p.m. ‘‘Antony and Cleopatra.’’
    Saturday, March 15: noon ‘‘Pericles’’; 3 p.m. ‘‘The Tempest’’ and 6 p.m. ‘‘Hamlet.’’


    48-Hour Films
    Shown March 13
    The Sitka Film Society will present the 48-Hour Film Festival Showcase 6 p.m. Thursday, March 13, at the Downtown Coliseum Theater.
    Nine filmmakers, or filmmaking teams, put together short films in a 48-hour time frame, including script, filming and editing. Filmmakers were given “prompts” that they didn’t know ahead of time, and were challenged to incorporate some of the 30 prompts into their films.
    Tickets are $5 at Old Harbor Books. Those with questions may call 747-1074.

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