TRAIL TRIMMING – Dyana Mutchler-Walsh trims trees and shrubs along the Castle Hill ramp this morning. Mutchler-Walsh is one of a half-dozen students building trails and doing trail maintenance this summer through a Southeast Alaska Independent Living program. The program wraps up Friday. (Sentinel Photo by James Poulson)

Alaska’s Oil Revenues Forecast to Dip $200M

    ANCHORAGE (AP) — Alaska’s latest revenue forecast has estimated a $200 million decrease in oil revenue after an excess of the resource contributed to lower prices worldwide, state officials said.
    The state Department of Revenue released the forecast Friday revealing both prices and production are running below expectations presenting challenges for state officials planning next year’s budget, officials said.
    The Alaska North Slope oil price is forecast to decline from the $66 originally projected in the spring to $63.54 a barrel before July 1 and $59 after July 1, department officials said.
    Meanwhile, oil production is also expected to decline from 541,000 barrels to 492,100 barrels each day, officials said.
    The estimated revenue reduction “is a sobering fact in Alaska’s fiscal reality. It is but another example of why fiscal discipline must be the cornerstone of a long-term fiscal plan,” Republican state Rep. Cathy Tilton told the Anchorage Daily News.
    Republican Gov. Mike Dunleavy is expected to introduce a preliminary version of the 2021 budget next week based on the forecast, state officials said. The state Legislature is expected to start considering his proposal when it convenes in January, officials said.
    The new projections “are very disappointing but not unexpected,” Alaska Policy Forum executive director Bethany Marcum said. She added that the forum believes “reducing spending will be a necessity again in the next legislative session.”
    The Department of Revenue was conservative in future oil production projections, particularly as new fields could come online on the North Slope, said Ed King, an Alaska-based economist.
    “New fields offer tremendous potential to increase production later in the 2020s but these developments are still contingent on final investment decisions and commitment of billions of dollars of new investments on the part of oil and gas producers,” Interim Revenue Commissioner Michael Barnhill said.
    “My administration uses these numbers to prepare the budget, we also understand they can and do fluctuate. An additional forecast will be out this spring that will provide more accurate information for the FY21 budget,” Dunleavy said.
   

August 5, 2020

A Note To Our Readers

Reopening: Phase One:

 

On March 30 the Daily Sitka Sentinel began taking precautions against the coronavirus, which was starting to show up in Alaska.

We closed our building to the public and four key employees started working remotely. Home delivery was suspended to protect our carriers from exposure to the virus.

Four months later, the virus is still with us and the precautions remain in effect.

In appreciation for the willingness of our subscribers to pick up their daily paper at drop-off sites, the Sentinel was free to all readers, and subscriptions were extended without charge.

As of August 1 the Sentinel is once again charging for subscriptions, but the present method of having subscribers pick up their papers at designated sites will continue.

The expiration date of all subscriptions has been extended without charge for an additional four months.

We thank our readers for their support in these uncertain times, and especially those who paid for the paper despite the free offer.

We look forward to the time when we can safely resume home delivery.

To check on the expiration of your subscription or to make a payment please call 747-3219. The subscription email address is This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. . We also will be mailing out reminder cards.

The single copy price is again 75 cents. The news racks do not require coins to open, but we ask that the 75 cents for a non-subscription single copy sale be paid with coins in the slot.

– The Sitka Sentinel Staff

 

Login Form

______________________

 

Alaska COVID-19
At a Glance

(updated 8-6-20)

By Sentinel Staff

The state Department of Health and Social Services has posted the following update on the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Alaska as of 10:45 a.m. Thursday.

New cases as of Wednesday: 40

Total statewide – 3,484

Total (cumulative) deaths – 25

Active cases in Sitka – 19 (14 resident; 5 non-resident) *

Recovered cases in Sitka – 15 (11 resident; 4 non-resident) *

The state says the cumulative number of cases hospitalized is 141.

To visit the Alaska DHSS Corona Response dashboard website click here.

* These numbers reflect State of Alaska data. Local cases may not immediately appear on DHSS site, or are reported on patient’s town of residence rather than Sitka’s statistics. 

______________________

 

 

20 YEARS AGO
August 2000

The city’s solid waste incinerator closed Wednesday, two days after the contract with Sheldon Jackson College for its operation ended. ... The city will ship all municipal waste except biosolids off-island to a landfill in Washington. The biosolids will be buried in the Kimsham landfill, Public Works Director Hugh Bevan said.

50 YEARS AGO
August 1970

Ernest Robertson, a Sitka resident most of his life, has moved back here with his family after a five-year sojourn in Anchorage. “Anchorage was just too big,” Ernie said. “It wasn’t like Sitka, where every time you go out on the street you meet your friends.”

__________________ 

 

 

Facebook

calendar