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A WALK IN THE PARK – Jim Moormann walks through Sitka National Historical Park this morning, as he has every day for the past two and a half years. This Saturday is National Trails Day, an annual event which began in 1993 to honor the National Trail System. In normal years volunteers help with trail maintenance in parks across the country. This year there will be no organized cleanup in Sitka and, without tour ship visitors, Sitkans will have the park to themselves. (Sentinel Photo by James Poulson)

Trans-Alaska Pipeline Co. To Allow More Oil to Flow

ANCHORAGE (AP) — The operator of the trans-Alaska pipeline said it will accept more oil as global demand begins to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic, while a major producer has not altered plans to cut production.

Alyeska Pipeline Service Co. expects to reduce its previous cut in the amount of North Slope oil allowed through the pipeline, The Anchorage Daily News reported  Tuesday.

But ConocoPhillips Co. has not altered its decision to cut Alaska production by about half.

“The decision to curtail production by 100,000 barrels a day in June has been made, and that won’t change,” ConocoPhillips spokeswoman Natalie Lowman said.

Alyeska announced a 50,000-barrel reduction to daily production in April, cutting North Slope output by 10%.

The company said it foresaw a period of high inventory at its Valdez tank farm in late May.

The company curtailed levels by 25,000 barrels daily, or a 5% drop of North Slope production, Alyeska President Brigham McCown said in a tweet.

For a short period before that, Alyeska cut production by 75,000 barrels daily as part of a process known as pro-rationing.

As the pipeline operator accepted less oil in April, North Slope oil production dropped from more than 500,000 barrels daily to around 420,000 barrels about a week ago. The production amount has risen since then, officials said.

North Slope oil production dipped below 400,000 barrels daily for several days last summer, the season when equipment maintenance often slows production.

For most people, the coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough that clear up in two to three weeks. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia and death. The vast majority of people recover.

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Alaska COVID-19
At a Glance

(updated 6-5-20)

By Sentinel Staff

The state Department of Health and Social Services has posted the following update on the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Alaska as of 11:50 a.m. Friday.

New cases as of Thursday: 11

Total statewide – 524

The state says the cumulative number of cases hospitalized is 48, and the cumulative number of deaths is 10.

To visit the Alaska DHSS Corona Response dashboard website click here.

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Welcome to the Sitka Sentinel's web page. In order to make the Sentinel's news more easily available during the COVID-19 pandemic, we have taken down the paywall to access articles on this page. Just click on an article headline to read the story. 

March 23, 2020

NOTICE FROM THE PUBLISHERS

TO READERS AND ADVERTISERS

For the duration of the COVID-19 disaster emergency declared by federal, state and local authorities, the Sentinel is taking additional measures to reduce virus exposure to its employees and contractors as well as to the public, while continuing to publish a daily news report for Sitka.

To the extent possible, Sentinel news and sales staff will be working from home. For the protection of our carriers, home delivery of the newspaper will be stopped effective Tuesday, March 24.

The Sentinel will continue to publish on its website sitkasentinel.com. Access to the website will be free to all users. The Sentinel will also produce a print edition Monday through Friday. It will be available to all readers without charge, at locations throughout town.

Initially, these locations are those where the Sentinel's newspaper vending machines are already in place. The coin mechanisms will be disabled or the doors removed to permit easy access. The Sentinel will work with the stores where the paper is usually sold, to designate a place inside or outside the store where the free edition can be made available.  

Home delivery subscriptions are on hold, and after the end of the disaster emergency, subscriptions will be extended at no charge for the number of days that there was no home delivery.

The Sentinel will make its print edition available to the public as early in the day as possible. with all personnel taking precautions to prevent spread of the virus.

The Sentinel is calling upon its customers to observe the COVID-19 emergency precautions already in place, particularly in maintaining a six-foot social distance from others at newspaper distribution sites.

Following is the statement issued by the Sentinel on March 16, stating the Sentinel's emergency procedures, which remain in effect.

The Sentinel office at 112 Barracks Street is closed to the public. We encourage people to use the phone, email or the U.S. Postal Service as much as possible.There is a slot in the front door of the office for ads, news items and payment checks. Emails may be sent to  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. and the phone number is (907) 747-3219.                                                                          

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